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Tables and indexes vs. HDD and SSD

Although in the future most database servers (particularly those handling OLTP-like workloads) will use a flash-based storage, we’re not there yet – flash storage is still considerably more expensive than traditional hard drives, and so many systems use a mix of SSD and HDD drives.

pgBackRest 1.0 Released

The first stable of release of pgBackRest introduces a new, more capable repository format, simpler configuration, and comprehensive support for backup and restore of symlinked directories and files.

Visualização de Postgres Plan Query

Uma ferramenta que pode fazer planos (EXPLAIN) simples de entender e visualmente agradável.

PG Phriday: Trusty Table Tiers

Well, there is another way to do partitioning that’s almost never mentioned. The idea is to actually utilize the base table as a storage target, and in lieu of triggers, schedule data movement during low-volume time periods. The primary benefit to this is that there’s no more trigger overhead.

Safe and unsafe operations for high volume PostgreSQL

If I run a bad command, it can lock out updates to a table for a long time. For example, if I create a new index on table, I cannot create new record in this table while that index is building. Anyone who tries to make a record in this table will block, and possibly time out, causing a partial outage. In general, I am ok with database operations taking a long time. However, any operation that locks a table for updates for more than a few seconds means downtime for me.

I decided to make a list of an operations, which can be done safe (without downtime) and usafe.

 

 

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