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Intro Guide to Dockerfile Best Practices

There are over one million Dockerfiles on GitHub today, but not all Dockerfiles are created equally. Efficiency is critical, and this blog series will cover five areas for Dockerfile best practices to help you write better Dockerfiles: incremental build time, image size, maintainability, security and repeatability. If you’re just beginning with Docker, this first blog post is for you! The next posts in the series will be more advanced.

The case against the ifsetor function

how to traverse nested array structures with potentially non-existing keys without throwing notices

Laravel Beyond CRUD

Proposal for thinking Laravel applications using DDD approach. A blog series for PHP developers working on larger-than-average Laravel projects.

Designing Your First App in Kubernetes, Part 1: Getting Started

Kubernetes’s gravity as the container orchestrator of choice continues to grow, and for good reason: It has the broadest capabilities of any container orchestrator available today. But all that power comes with a price; jumping into the cockpit of a state-of-the-art jet puts a lot of power under you, but how to actually fly the thing is not obvious.

How to run short ALTER TABLE without long locking concurrent queries

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PostgreSQL Tuning: Key Things to Drive Performance

Performance is one of the key requirements in software architecture design, and has been the focus of PostgreSQL developers since its beginnings

Illuminate your career

If you are a developer, this article is for you.

5 Things You Have Never Done with a REST Specification

How to to Backup Linux with Snapshots

While working on different web projects I have accumulated a large pool of tools and services to facilitate the work of developers, system administrators and DevOps
One of the first challenges, that every developer faces at the end of each project is backup configuration and maintenance of media files, UGC, databases, application and servers' data (e.g. configuration files).

Awesome PHP

A curated list of amazingly awesome PHP libraries, resources and shiny things.

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docz

It has never been so easy to document your things!

usql

A universal command-line interface for PostgreSQL, MySQL, Oracle Database, SQLite3, Microsoft SQL Server, and many other databases including NoSQL and non-relational databases!

Agendando tarefas com o Cron para Node

O Cron para Node é um pacote npm que nos permite fazer o agendamento de tarefas baseado em uma regra de tempo. Ele é baseado no Cron do Linux e seu funcionamento segue a mesma linha. Com ele é possível definir uma função para ser executada de tempos em tempos, ou seja, ela será agendada para ser executada dentro do Node. É uma maneira bastante eficaz para tarefas repetitivas que precisam rodar em segundo plano, como o envio de notificação, backup de banco de dados, entre outras.

Howto: use one VCL per domain

The Varnish Configuration Language (VCL), I'm sure you know already, is the source of Varnish versatility: by only enforcing the protocol flow and leaving the business logic to the user, Varnish can be easily configured to do things far beyond caching.

However, because the logic of websites is generally focused around hosts, and the VCL thinks in terms of processing steps, configuration may sometimes a bit odd, with the need to place safeguards around your code to ensure that logic for one host isn't applied to another one.

It works, but it can be tedious and unwieldy, so today we are going to have a look at how we can silo our VCL per website to achieve better maintainability.

Understanding the 8 Fallacies of Distributed Systems

Are you working on a distributed system? Microservices, Web APIs, SOA, web server, application server, database server, cache server, load balancer - if these describe components in your system's design, then the answer is yes. Distributed systems are comprised of many computers that coordinate to achieve a common goal.

More than 20 years ago Peter Deutsch and James Gosling defined the 8 fallacies of distributed computing. These are false assumptions that many developers make about distributed systems. These are usually proven wrong in the long run, leading to hard to fix bugs.